Show more

Robert F. Wagner, Jr. Park Cafe and Viewing Platform

NY

Parks
4 Total, Show more
Architect

Machado and Silvetti Associates

Landscape Architect

Olin Partnership

Commissioner

The Battery Conservancy

Collaborating Landscape Architect

Lynden Miller

Description Show more

Robert F. Wagner, Jr. Park occupies a unique site, characterized by its relatively small area located at the center of colossal surroundings. The main function of this public place—and the reason for its existence—is the privileged viewing of the Statue of Liberty and New York Harbor. The design of the park comprises three main components: a pair of allées that brings pedestrians towards the main park entrance; a pair of pavilions connected by a bridge constituting the main building; and a lawn terrace framed by continuous paths and benches. This “Y” shaped architectural ensemble is the backbone of the park, resting in gardens and fields of grass that connect to the Battery Park City Esplanade and to Battery Park. The building is conceived as a large, over-scaled, massive masonry wall split in the center, framing the view to the Statue. On the wall’s surfaces, a variety of brick patterns are displayed following a precise figurative symbolic strategy. This “lithic” formation is used to develop a pair of large public steps that seemingly prolong the allées and bring the public up to a pair of balconies overlooking the lawn and harbor. From the center of the bridge connecting the two balconies, the viewer’s direct relation to the Statue of Liberty is “face to face.”

Robert F. Wagner, Jr. Park occupies a unique site, characterized by its relatively small area located at the center of colossal surroundings. The main function of this public place—and the reason for its existence—is the privileged viewing of the Statue of Liberty and New York Harbor. The design of the park comprises three main components: a pair of allées that brings pedestrians towards the main park entrance; a pair of pavilions connected by a bridge constituting the main building; and a lawn terrace framed by continuous paths and benches. This “Y” shaped architectural ensemble is the backbone of the park, resting in gardens and fields of grass that connect to the Battery Park City Esplanade and to Battery Park. The building is conceived as a large, over-scaled, massive masonry wall split in the center, framing the view to the Statue. On the wall’s surfaces, a variety of brick patterns are displayed following a precise figurative symbolic strategy. This “lithic” formation is used to develop a pair of large public steps that seemingly prolong the allées and bring the public up to a pair of balconies overlooking the lawn and harbor. From the center of the bridge connecting the two balconies, the viewer’s direct relation to the Statue of Liberty is “face to face.”

Tours

Battery Park City

Robert F. Wagner Jr. Park

20 Battery Place, New York City, NY, US 10004

Nearby
Skyscraper Museum 199 feet
Resonating Bodies 234 feet
Ape and Cat (At the Dance) 435 feet
Battery Park City School, PS/IS 276 481 feet
Garden of Stones 502 feet
Museum of Jewish Heritage: A Living Memorial to the Holocaust 622 feet
American Merchant Mariners' Memorial 688 feet
Pier A 750 feet
River That Flows Two Ways 864 feet
#Planning #Public Space #Parks #Landscape #Park #Architecture #Hospitality #Peter Mauss / ESTO #New York City #Battery Park #Cultural Landmark